Transportation contributes 26% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Promoting local jobs that reduce car-based commuting positively impacts climate change, local air quality, and our physical health and safety. Smart phones showcase the economic opportunity technological innovation ignites, demonstrating how suburban communities -- far removed from research hubs and tech centers -- can nonetheless benefit from the transportation revolution already underway. The cellular phone was introduced in 1973; its purpose was telephony. Nearly half a century later, the smart phone is a hand-held app store generating a $51 billion app economy (2016). The take-away:  technology invents, culture/society adopts and adapts, generating unanticipated opportunity and productivity. Thus far cities have been the primary sites of AV testing, yet spatially diffuse, low-density suburbs poorly served by fixed transit systems are natural candidates for the nimble mobility transportation innovation offers. Our suburban communities can be at the forefront of this new economy -- vital not only for future prosperity but also to sustain independence and quality of life for aging residents facing limited mobility options. August 17, 2017; The Unitarian Church in Westport, Connecticut. Special thanks to Indivisible CT4.   BIOS ALEX CLARK Alex is a researcher at the Harvard John F. Kennedy School of Government and the 2016-17 Henry Fellow at Harvard University. He holds an MSc in Global Governance and Diplomacy from Oxford University, UK, and a BA in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from Warwick University, UK. His principal field of interest is international climate and energy policy, and his current research focuses on the electrification of transport. Alex has previously worked with the IUCN, International Migration Institute, and Sustainable Development Solutions Network. He coordinates Galvanizing the Groundswell of Climate Actions, an international dialogue network pushing for ambitious subnational and non-state climate action in parallel to the UN process. Alex will be moving to San Francisco in September to join the Climate Policy Initiative. MICHAEL LIN Michael Lin is a third year Computer Science Major attending the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta. He currently leads the Telemetry team of Georgia Tech's Solar Racing team, which designs, builds and races solar-powered automobiles. He has conducted research in experimental communication technologies built out of household LEDs, and is currently pursuing machine learning research pertaining to mental health and social media. CHLOE MANDEL Chloe is a rising junior at Wilton High School, Connecticut. Chloe lived in Nigeria for a year and did one year of online school while traveling in several European countries. She enjoys writing, computer science, and environmental research. Chloe is interested in combining marketing, technology, and community relations.  OLIVIA GREENSPAN TILL co-founder Olivia Greenspan is the 2017 Fairfield County, Connecticut, Farm Bureau Lyman Wells Scholar and 2017-18 Real Estate Innovation Fellow at the Fordham Social Innovation Collaboratory, NYC. Olivia regularly presents on social innovation and entrepreneurship, including at the 2017 Ashoka U Conference in Miami, Florida, the largest network of social entrepreneurs globally. 2015-16, Olivia interned with ag-tech startup Agrivolution and was a consultant for BMW, electric i3 division, presenting to BMW executives on leveraging untapped markets to increase sales. 2013-15, she was re-wire principal of the Food & Farming research vertical. Olivia is a rising junior at Fordham University, NYC, majoring in Economics, with a focus on environmental sustainability and ecological psychology. JANE PHILBRICK TILL founder Jane Philbrick is an artist, educator, and writer. Her large-scale installations and sculpture range in media from ultrasound and rammed earth to magnetic levitation and found space. She works in collaboration across disciplines in science and engineering, architecture, music, and performance. Jane is a former Artist Fellow at the Center for Advanced Visual Studies, Massachussetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, and MacDowell Colony, Peterborough, New Hampshire. With two-year funding (2013, 2014) from the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development, Jane launched re-wire, artist-led, community-based predevelopment for the Georgetown, Connecticut, Gilbert & Bennett wire mill. Prior to re-wire, Jane was Director of Programme and Visiting Professor, C:Art MFA, Valand School of Fine Art, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. She currently teaches in the Art, Media, and Technology MFA Program, Parsons School of Design, The New School, NYC. In 2018, TILL pilots the first in a series of themed artist residencies at Residency Unlimited, Brooklyn. Jane holds a bachelor's degree from Barnard College, Columbia University, and a master's from the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University.   TILL is an international, intergenerational, multidisciplinary team focused on holistic, community-based brownfield regeneration. We seek community-specific solutions that engage the global context. Our inclusive development process includes hosting community conversations with emerging and established leaders in diverse fields to build awareness and common ground on key issues of ecological and economic sustainability and opportunity at the local level. 2017-18 program (to date): phytoremediation, financialization and community cost, suburban mobility, creative industries, indoor agriculture, carbon-negative building technologies, and young people serving in local government.  

 

 

Transportation contributes 26% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Promoting local jobs that reduce car-based commuting positively impacts climate change, local air quality, and our physical health and safety. Smart phones showcase the economic opportunity technological innovation ignites, demonstrating how suburban communities -- far removed from research hubs and tech centers -- can nonetheless benefit from the transportation revolution already underway. The cellular phone was introduced in 1973; its purpose was telephony. Nearly half a century later, the smart phone is a hand-held app store generating a $51 billion app economy (2016). The take-away:  technology invents, culture/society adopts and adapts, generating unanticipated opportunity and productivity. Thus far cities have been the primary sites of AV testing, yet spatially diffuse, low-density suburbs poorly served by fixed transit systems are natural candidates for the nimble mobility transportation innovation offers. Our suburban communities can be at the forefront of this new economy -- vital not only for future prosperity but also to sustain independence and quality of life for aging residents facing limited mobility options.

August 17, 2017; The Unitarian Church in Westport, Connecticut. Special thanks to Indivisible CT4.

 

BIOS

ALEX CLARK

Alex is a researcher at the Harvard John F. Kennedy School of Government and the 2016-17 Henry Fellow at Harvard University. He holds an MSc in Global Governance and Diplomacy from Oxford University, UK, and a BA in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from Warwick University, UK. His principal field of interest is international climate and energy policy, and his current research focuses on the electrification of transport. Alex has previously worked with the IUCN, International Migration Institute, and Sustainable Development Solutions Network. He coordinates Galvanizing the Groundswell of Climate Actions, an international dialogue network pushing for ambitious subnational and non-state climate action in parallel to the UN process. Alex will be moving to San Francisco in September to join the Climate Policy Initiative.

MICHAEL LIN

Michael Lin is a third year Computer Science Major attending the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta. He currently leads the Telemetry team of Georgia Tech's Solar Racing team, which designs, builds and races solar-powered automobiles. He has conducted research in experimental communication technologies built out of household LEDs, and is currently pursuing machine learning research pertaining to mental health and social media.

CHLOE MANDEL

Chloe is a rising junior at Wilton High School, Connecticut. Chloe lived in Nigeria for a year and did one year of online school while traveling in several European countries. She enjoys writing, computer science, and environmental research. Chloe is interested in combining marketing, technology, and community relations. 

OLIVIA GREENSPAN

TILL co-founder Olivia Greenspan is the 2017 Fairfield County, Connecticut, Farm Bureau Lyman Wells Scholar and 2017-18 Real Estate Innovation Fellow at the Fordham Social Innovation Collaboratory, NYC. Olivia regularly presents on social innovation and entrepreneurship, including at the 2017 Ashoka U Conference in Miami, Florida, the largest network of social entrepreneurs globally. 2015-16, Olivia interned with ag-tech startup Agrivolution and was a consultant for BMW, electric i3 division, presenting to BMW executives on leveraging untapped markets to increase sales. 2013-15, she was re-wire principal of the Food & Farming research vertical. Olivia is a rising junior at Fordham University, NYC, majoring in Economics, with a focus on environmental sustainability and ecological psychology.

JANE PHILBRICK

TILL founder Jane Philbrick is an artist, educator, and writer. Her large-scale installations and sculpture range in media from ultrasound and rammed earth to magnetic levitation and found space. She works in collaboration across disciplines in science and engineering, architecture, music, and performance. Jane is a former Artist Fellow at the Center for Advanced Visual Studies, Massachussetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, and MacDowell Colony, Peterborough, New Hampshire. With two-year funding (2013, 2014) from the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development, Jane launched re-wire, artist-led, community-based predevelopment for the Georgetown, Connecticut, Gilbert & Bennett wire mill. Prior to re-wire, Jane was Director of Programme and Visiting Professor, C:Art MFA, Valand School of Fine Art, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. She currently teaches in the Art, Media, and Technology MFA Program, Parsons School of Design, The New School, NYC. In 2018, TILL pilots the first in a series of themed artist residencies at Residency Unlimited, Brooklyn. Jane holds a bachelor's degree from Barnard College, Columbia University, and a master's from the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University.

 

TILL is an international, intergenerational, multidisciplinary team focused on holistic, community-based brownfield regeneration. We seek community-specific solutions that engage the global context. Our inclusive development process includes hosting community conversations with emerging and established leaders in diverse fields to build awareness and common ground on key issues of ecological and economic sustainability and opportunity at the local level. 2017-18 program (to date): phytoremediation, financialization and community cost, suburban mobility, creative industries, indoor agriculture, carbon-negative building technologies, and young people serving in local government.